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Posts Tagged ‘rooftop garden’

During the last two months of my Peace Corps service, I began to collaborate with CIASPE on a rooftop garden in a day-care center (t.e.p.e). The students in the Center are at risk of childhood labor and/or at risk of living and working on the street. The school garden was to serve as a way to connect the children with nature, learn a useful set of skills, and offer a break from the regular classroom routine. Sandra, my co-worker, and I were to facilitate sessions with 3 different age groups ranging from kindergarten to high school. The planning of each session was complex, as each age group was very distinct, but the planned activity for each day was to be the same.

We began with the base – soil and composting. The high school boys weren’t too happy about using a shovel or getting dirty. The middle school kids really liked soil, so much so that they found it fun to throw it at classmates. The kindergarten students were content simply running their hands through the soil. After Day 1, a day full of trying to maintain control, attention, and in-tact fingers, Sandra and I went back to CIASPE exhausted. We began to pick apart the session to see what went right, what went wrong, and how we could move past incidents like “soil in the face of a friend” and the resultant hysterics. We knew we had to change our approach and come to an agreement with the students about appropriate guidelines. That’s when Guideline 1 was created: No throwing soil at oneself or another student.

With each session, the list of guidelines grew. We utilized guidelines rather than rules to avoid becoming potentates. We wanted to create an environment in which the students had control over one another, the sessions, and the activities. After all, it was their garden. Sandra and I were not going to water it daily. They were. We were not going to decide what was planted. They were. We knew how important it is that the participants’ have a sense of ownership of the garden, because experience has shown that school gardens are everyone’s when there are pretty butterfly visitors, but when it comes time to weed it is no one’s. We needed the students to be excited and more importantly, invested.

The chaos boiled down. That was until they found a frog. That session was a ruckus. But instead of fighting it, Sandra and I abandoned seeding to learn more about frogs’ habitat and what they need to survive. So, things were going along pretty swimmingly and the rooftop garden was growing. We had some beets ready to harvest, some chard, and the herbs were doing great with Queretaro’s full sun. Many students were still learning the names of many of the veggies, so we wanted to keep the excitement growing and actually have them taste the fruits of their labor. To experience earthy beets, distinguish chard from lettuce, and bite into a crisp carrot is to fall in love with a garden. To give the students that experience, we designed a cooking class.

We were scared, yes. Little kids with knives. Little kids with blenders. Older kids with knives. Older kids with blenders. But we threw caution to the wind, and the result was pure beauty. The kids, of all levels, were the most behaved they have ever been. We chopped up some beets, and prepared them with tajín and lime – they wanted to lick the plate! We prepared water with swiss chard, lime, basil, and chia – they held out their cups for more. We made a big salad with lettuce, carrots, beets, onion, amaranth, and pear tomatoes – they began planning to seed more carrots. As a foodie, I was elated to watch their excitement as they bit into the beet and commented to one another, “this tastes different than the one my mom buys,” and “we need to plant more of these.”

As Sandra and I discussed the session, we realized that we didn’t need any new guidelines that day. All along, we just had to give them some green juice.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: I am now a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer back in NYC planning for the next adventure. Stay tuned!

Watering the Garden

Can't Get Enough of those BEETS!

Future Foodies!

Future Foodies!

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I have struggled with the incongruous factors of wanting to grow vegetables, but not having a place to do it. For that reason, I began to look into urban gardening, and visiting such places as the Eagle Street Rooftop Farm in Brooklyn, NY. When I saw the more than ample rooftop space in my apartment here in Huimilpan, México, I knew the time had finally arrived to experiment with rooftop farming, or more specifically, container gardening. Over the past few months, I have found that it is indeed possible to grow a significant amount of food in containers and my roof is transforming from a concrete wasteland to my lush Eden of edibles. Ok, I haven’t quite reached Paradise yet, but I do have fresh lettuce, cilantro, rosemary, arugula, swiss chard, lavender, dill, basil, and baby tomato plants. I have definitely come a long way from where I first started.

The same principles of the biointensive gardening method in earth gardening can be applied in container gardening. That is to say, that the association of the crops is also important in the containers and companion planting can help plants to fight and keep away plagues and even improve the plants’ flavor.  Check out examples of said “companions” here. You also want to add the flowers not only for the aesthetics but also to attract pollinators. This little garden is helping me to produce organic and locally adapted seeds to share with community members, helping me to clear my mind, and helping me to avoid drinking Coca-Cola for Breakfast.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: The little pup’s name is Canela or Cinnamon. I found her abandoned about a month ago, and took her in with the intention of finding her a good home. We haven’t had much luck yet, but still have hope. Isn’t she adorable?

PPS: Worm compost is also great to have on the rooftop or urban garden. Those worms work hard turning your kitchen waste into great humus for your seedlings.

Rooftop Garden

Lettuce, Arugula, and a Street Dog named Canela

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There is only so much reading and learning about the sustainable food movement you can do before you start growing your own vegetables and begin to break reliance on others for personal nutrition. I’ve wwoofed working on organic farms in upstate New York and New Orleans, I’ve attended courses about the permaculture and biointensive farming methods, and have a mind satiated with information. But what purpose does information serve if you don’t put it to use? Now it is time for me to get my hands dirty, get some seeds germinating, and have a patch of land that I can call my own and care for.

Due to a lack of literal land, my roof in my Mexican home has always been the place I go to find some silence, and roast in the hot sun. And now, my roof will also be the place I can find some fresh arugula and comforting greenery in this desert landscape. The roof allows my veggies to receive the recommended dosage of 5 to 8 hours of sun daily, and I won’t have to travel too far to give the garden the daily care it needs. The idea to start my own rooftop garden has been taking root for the past few months, so I was constantly thinking of ways I can make it work with the available resources. After I got my worm compost started, my next goal became to germinate seeds.

Rather than buying anything, I looked for things around the house to reuse as small planting boxes. I began to set aside plastic cookie trays and take-out containers, milk cartons, and even toilet paper rolls. I also began to collect organic seeds, harvested from the local environment from women in the communities and local Mexican organizations dedicated to the sustainable food movement, such as CIASPE and na ya’ax. Because these seeds are local, they have evolved to be better adapted to the environment here in Querétaro. One of the many benefits to seed diversity.

In addition to the start of becoming autonomous in my alimentation, I am also beginning my march in the Organic Food Revolution. A Revolution dedicated to helping rejuvenate the land we have stripped, and empowering people once again to grow their own food and having the right to a healthy, chemical-free diet. A Revolution that I can support and truly believe in.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: The rooftop garden will enable me to serve as an example and share the information you only find by doing. I’m working with community members of Huimilpan to start their own gardens, grow their own food, eat healthier, and save money in the process.

PPS: Happy Earth Day!

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Rooftop Garden

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