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Posts Tagged ‘Arizona’

Say hi to the Easter bunny and have a beautiful Spring day.

The twigster,

Josephine

PS: Eat a peep.

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Arizona is the place to be if you want some sun. Here are some highlights from a few places I visited.

Bisbee, AZ: 90 miles southeast of Tucson, this little city is full of charm. An old mining town, Bisbee has developed into a vibrant artist community. I enjoyed walking the winding streets of the town, popping into antique stores and jewelry shops. If you ever find yourself in Bisbee, I recommend staying at the Copper Queen Hotel, grabbing some drinks at the Grand Hotel Saloon and enjoying a delicious vegan dinner at POCO Restaurant.

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Tucson, AZ: We were always traveling through Tucson on the weekends so I was able to see a fair bit of the city’s nightlife. 4th Avenue, which is in close proximity to the University of Arizona, was always teeming with action. We saw some great live music at Hotel Congress, a smaller venue with an outdoor seating area that gives you a chance to interact with locals. Before catching a show, be sure to stop into the restaurant, Pasco. You won’t be disappointed with a Father Kino cocktail. Yummy.

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Sonoita, AZ: Rolling grasslands make Sonoita a peaceful place to rest after touring the nearby vineyards of Elgin, AZ. I had the pleasure of staying at La Hacienda de Sonoita. Usually I am not too keen on staying at bed and breakfasts, but this experience may have changed my mind. Guests’ rooms are detached from the main space, giving you lots of privacy. The B&B maintains its homey feel, however, with the delicious home-cooked breakfast served by the owners. Imagine the tastiness of French toast croissants accompanied by fresh fruit, granola, and Greek yogurt. Add the two dogs running around in the yard, and you have yourself a home away from home.

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Tubac, AZ: I passed through Tubac quickly, with only an hour to take in all that the town has to offer. That surely wasn’t enough time. Another artist community, Tubac has lots of galleries and shops with handcrafted items. Only about a 40 minute drive from Tucson, Tubac is worth the trip. Check out some of the public art in Tubac.

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The twigster,
Josephine

PS: I apologize if this post isn’t formatted too nicely. I am writing and loading photos from an iPhone. Gets a little tricky.

PPS: Here is one of my favorite sights to see in Arizona. Look at those donkeys!

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The twigster,

Josephine

PS: Don’t you just want to lie in a field of these flowers?


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At every rest stop, while arranging the smorgasbord of cookies, potato chips and granola bars, a cyclist would ask, “When are you going to start riding?” A fan of cruising at a nice leisurely pace and terrified of biking on highways, I kept promising that I would start the following day. Apparently, the cycling world is inhabited by very committed and passionate people, who want to share their infatuation with the sport. Needless to say, the pestering never ceased. Finally, one day at lunch, I decided to hop on that most uncomfortable saddle. I strapped on my helmet and rode on slowly but surely as 60 year olds zoomed by me, always with an encouraging smile of course. I had to stop about every 7 miles for a butt stretch, but I did indeed ride the 25 miles in from the lunch stop to the hotel. The nudging stopped, but the burning began. I picked a section with a massive mountain climb for my inaugural cycle. My poor bum.

The twigster,

Josephine

PS: Cycling really is a beautiful way to see the world. Interested? Check out PAC Tour.

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While exploring the desert plants of Arizona for the past few weeks, the jumping cholla cacti have pricked their way into my heart. Don’t let the common name of teddy bear cactus fool you into thinking this is one of those fuzzy petting cacti. Contrarily, chollas have sharp and barbed spines that aid in its reproduction. As a segmented cactus, each segment is loosely attached to the one preceding it. So when an animal or an unfortunate human being brushes against the cactus, the spines get a good grip on the passerby and the segment breaks from the parent. The clinger can then take root and grow into a new plant, which explains why you often see these cuties clustered together. I like to think of it as the starfish of the desert. Pretty cool, huh?

The twigster,

Josephine

PS: Cholla is pronounced chȯi-yə. Chȯi-yə, chȯi-yə, chȯi-yə!!!!!!

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I have one more week, to the day, until I depart for Chicago and begin traveling throughout the west. As one adventure often leads to another, I am wandering with a fellow wwoofer (Parker) I met while working with Lowernine.org down in New Orleans. Of course budgets and my tentative Peace Corps departure in July will factor into travel plans, but otherwise we have little restrictions on where and when we will travel.

To start off the adventure, we’re going to work for PAC Tour, Pacific-Atlantic-Cycling Tour, during their Arizona Desert Training Camp for three weeks. While I admittedly know zilch about cycling and endurance cycling at that, I am intrigued to see what it’s all about while also taking in Arizona’s countryside.  Texas is the farthest west I’ve made it within the US and the frontier is calling…

Travel plans thus far…

New York City -> Chicago/suburbs of Chicago -> Road trip to Arizona -> Arizona -> ?

PS: Check out the logic behind this bold statement: “There is nothing natural about the concept of wilderness.” This is one my favorite essays about the wilderness and the western frontier by William Cronon. I’ve struggled with this essay and often come back to it and reflect upon Cronon’s message.

The twigster,

Josephine

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