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Archive for the ‘Street Dogs’ Category

A little glimpse into my life in Mexico these days.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: Try to make a story by connecting the pictures.

Here’s mine: I’m a dog and I like to run around in the corn. Oh! and I loveeee flowers. Flowers. Flowers. Blue flowers! There’s my master at work. She’s always in the store. She should come play in the mud!

IMG_7586_2 CIASPE: In Bloom IMG_7520 IMG_7331

 

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It was a rainy and chilly day in Huimilpan. The sky was overcast and that seemingly omnipresent sun was nowhere to be found. I was working from home that day, an excuse to stay in sweatpants and a flannel shirt. Hunger, boredom or procrastination led me to the kitchen in search of something edible. Moving around boxes of pasta and bags of uncooked beans, I knew I was down to the dregs of my kitchen supply. I had to leave the house. The horror.

I made it to the market without any run-ins. As much as I rock it,  grunge still hasn’t been accepted as a look here in Huimilpan. I was more than halfway back to my house with a full canvas bag of veggies on my shoulder when I spotted a small black fluff ball peaking up at me from under a truck. Naturally, I stopped. I’m cold, so she must be cold, I sympathized. I  got down on the stone sidewalk, and started calling to the little fluff. She came, I scooped.

Oh, I was just so excited. I had a new little friend. I rushed home while Fluff made herself cozy on my arm. I pulled out the remaining dog food from Canela’s stay and anticipated the chow down. Fluff casually walked over to the bowl, sniffed the croquettes, and came back to sit on my lap. Weird. We moved on to the bath. I took out the flea soap and the comb and got to work. Only one flea. Weird.

The little Fluff was so cold, so I decided to blow-dry her. She sat on my lap content as could be as I styled her curly black hair. She let me brush her paws. She let me hold her paws and look at her nails – her short, clipped nails. In that moment I realized exactly what I had done. I stole a dog. I finished her ‘do and did the only thing I could do. I took her right back to where I found her, dropped her off, and hoped her owners wouldn’t be confused by their dog’s spa day. Goodbye Fluff.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: I am going home for Christmas this year and I get to play with MY dog!

A Disguise

Street Dogs?

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I broke my biggest promise to myself. I saw a little dehydrated puppy scurrying under a nearby bush to hide from people, and I scooped her up – I scooped her up, wrapped her in a shirt, and speedily walked  to the Huimilpan vet. She was thirsty, hungry, and FULL of fleas. She also had the cutest little chocolate nose I had ever seen.

She went home with me that night. She got a name. I got a new best friend. Canela, or Cinnamon, sweet and spicy at the same time. Her personality perfectly embodied in a cooking spice. Since I had broken one promise to myself, I knew I had to make another. I promised that I would avidly search for a home for her, just like I did with the street kitty, Benny.  I had no idea though that most Mexicans don’t want female dogs. It is not part of the culture to neuter the dogs, and since they don’t want one dog to multiply into six, they shy away from the females.

And so, the search began for Canela’s home. Three months full of numerous posts on Facebook dog adoption groups in Querétaro, calls to dog shelters, and talking up the little pup didn’t get me very far. Until one day, one very nice man, wanted a puppy, and Canela was just the girl.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: I told myself that a street animal will not come home with me at least for three months. I got attached to this little Cinnamon Bun.

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I have struggled with the incongruous factors of wanting to grow vegetables, but not having a place to do it. For that reason, I began to look into urban gardening, and visiting such places as the Eagle Street Rooftop Farm in Brooklyn, NY. When I saw the more than ample rooftop space in my apartment here in Huimilpan, México, I knew the time had finally arrived to experiment with rooftop farming, or more specifically, container gardening. Over the past few months, I have found that it is indeed possible to grow a significant amount of food in containers and my roof is transforming from a concrete wasteland to my lush Eden of edibles. Ok, I haven’t quite reached Paradise yet, but I do have fresh lettuce, cilantro, rosemary, arugula, swiss chard, lavender, dill, basil, and baby tomato plants. I have definitely come a long way from where I first started.

The same principles of the biointensive gardening method in earth gardening can be applied in container gardening. That is to say, that the association of the crops is also important in the containers and companion planting can help plants to fight and keep away plagues and even improve the plants’ flavor.  Check out examples of said “companions” here. You also want to add the flowers not only for the aesthetics but also to attract pollinators. This little garden is helping me to produce organic and locally adapted seeds to share with community members, helping me to clear my mind, and helping me to avoid drinking Coca-Cola for Breakfast.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: The little pup’s name is Canela or Cinnamon. I found her abandoned about a month ago, and took her in with the intention of finding her a good home. We haven’t had much luck yet, but still have hope. Isn’t she adorable?

PPS: Worm compost is also great to have on the rooftop or urban garden. Those worms work hard turning your kitchen waste into great humus for your seedlings.

Rooftop Garden

Lettuce, Arugula, and a Street Dog named Canela

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a skinny little guy with only one eye open and a mess of matted fur. I’m not a cat person, but how could I leave a little guy the size of my hand out in the blazing sun without his mother or other siblings anywhere to found? So he came home with me, he went to the vet, got his eye drops, got his parasite medicine, and worked his way into my heart. His name is Beignet, or Benny – a reminder that my heart will always remain in New Orleans. And yes, he is named after a food like all of my little animals. (I have a Yorkie back in the States named Milano after the cookies.)

The day I took the little critter back home with me, I promised myself it would be temporary, only until I found him a home. I am staying true to my word and after a little over a month together, Benny is headed to Almealco, Querétaro tomorrow to live on an organic ranch. Not a bad ending for this little street kitty, huh?

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: He has taken to climbing up people’s pants for a good snuggle.

PPS: Check out the street dogs of México.

The size of my hand!

Can you spot Benny helping me on laundry day?

Can you spot Benny helping me on laundry day?

Fattened him up, gordito

A few months later… Benny’s owner sent me a picture to show me how much he has grown. This looks like one happy former street kitty.

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