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Archive for November, 2013

This Mexican culture that mocks death and celebrates it at the same has inspired me to write the following calavera. Calaveras are full of subtle or not so subtle wisecracks that criticize the living.  With that said,  please don’t take my poem too seriously…

In dedication to the dedicated Peace Corps Volunteer

Here lies a good Peace Corps Volunteer,
Who died of grief
From being stood up at community meetings,
Left alone at each meeting;
She has died of a defeat
Received a blow too big
And such was her foolishness
That she was already in the tomb,
Turned into skull and bones
And waiting for community members
to join for the meeting
of the dead.

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: Today was the last bio-intensive garden lesson in the communities. People are growing veggies!

Death by Diabetes: Dedicated To Those Who Loved Their Sugar

From Death to Compost

From Death to Compost: Dedicated to Those Who Have Fought For the Natural World

Diamond Encrusted: Dedicated to Those Who Die in Vain

Diamond Encrusted: Dedicated to Those Who Have Died in Vain

Hand in Hand: Dedicated to Those Who Have Died of a Broken Heart

Hand in Hand: Dedicated to Those Who Have Died of a Broken Heart

Cempasúchil: Dedicated to Those Who Have Not Given Up on Life and Her Beauty

Cempasúchil: Dedicated to Those Who Have Not Given Up on Life and Her Beauty

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The women are not very accustomed to eating their greens. Mexicans, in general, are not very accustomed to eating their greens. Part of the course, therefore, is to teach the women how to eat healthier, better utilize what they have in their gardens, and save money in the meantime. Since women have power over what is put on the table in these communities, we are encouraging the women to make smart choices in what they are feeding their children – start now in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Diabetes is the number one killer in Mexico, and Mexico is the most obese nation in the world. Yes, we are more than justified in suggesting these changes.

CIASPE shared very simple recipes with the women about how to make different kinds of milks and green waters. The women showed great interest during the course, commenting about the deliciousness and manageability of the recipes. The hope is that this enthusiasm will translate to their gardens – they will be motivated to grow a wider variety of vegetables and herbs and that they see their garden as an asset rather than a burden. I have shared a few of CIASPE’s recipes with you below.

Milk with some nutrition

The Director of CIASPE making nutritious and wallet-friendly milks.

Take this into consideration…Humans are the only creatures on earth that consume milk from another animal.

RICE MILK
Recommended use: indigestion, vomiting, diarrhea, post-surgery
Characteristics: It has almost no saturated fat or choloresterol, but also does NOT contain protein.
It helps to regulate the intestines.
Recipe:
(In order to make 1 liter of milk, you need 1/2 cup of rice and 1 liter of water)
1) Soak the rice for four hours.
2) Liquefy the rice in blender.
3) Add water.

OATMEAL MILK
Recommended use: high cholesterol, cardiovascular problems, constipation, strengthens the nervous system
Characteristics: Rich in fiber and Vitamin B.
Recipe:
(In order to make 1 liter of milk, you need 6 tablespoons of uncooked oatmeal and 1 liter of water)
1) Soak the oats overnight.
2) Liquefy the oats with the soaking water in the blender.
3) Add water.
4) Add cinnamon for flavor. (Cinnamon also speeds up the metabolism).

The women are taking notes!

The women are taking notes!

I am very excited about sharing these water recipes with the women and I am so very enthusiastic that this will cut down on their Coca Cola consumption.

CUCUMBER AND MINT WATER
Ingredients: 1 liter of water, 1 handful of mint, 1 big cucumber diced
Recipe: Mix all the ingredients in a jar and leave in the refrigerator for 2 hours for all the flavors to come together.

CUCUMBER AND LIME WATER
Ingredients: 1 liter of water, 2 skinned cucumbers (without seeds, diced), 3/4 cup of lime juice, 1/3 cup of sugar (or substitute with honey)
Recipe:
1) Put all of the ingredients in the blender.
2) Drain the water using a colander.

OTHER WATER COMBINATIONS
* Parsley and lime (Parsley is packed with vitamin C, so use it as an immune system boost.)
* Chard and lime
* Spinach and pineapple or guayaba
* Beet and lime
* Nopal, celery, and pineapple
* Celery and pineapple
* Basil, mint, lime and sugar

* When the recipe calls for the lime, put the entire lime in the blender. The majority of the vitamins are in the skin. ¡Ojo! Do not liquify the lime for a long time, or it will cause the water to taste bitter.

the twigster,
Josephine

PS: I’d love to hear if you have any other great combinations for the waters.

PPS: Check out Biointensive Garening: Session 1 here.

A Different Future

A Different Future of Eating Habits

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Women in three communities of Huimilpan, Querétaro – Piedras Lisas, Capula, and El Sauz Norte were trained in the mosaic method of gardening two years ago – long before Peace Corps volunteers arrived to their pueblito. They planted their cilantro and broccoli in haphazard beds, explored flowers for seeds, and experimented with growing leafy greens. They improvised and learned with their hands in the soil. When my compañera and I conducted interviews upon our arrival, the women spoke of their gardens enthusiastically, but with a tinge of defeat. After a few interviews, we began to see a common theme of lingering questions. What vegetables do I seed for the winter? What can I do to get rid of the worm in the col? What do I do with all this swiss chard?

Since the women of these communities saw the benefits of growing food for their families, and were driven to continue advancing, another volunteer and I collaborated together to write a SPA grant. In partnership with the organization, CIASPE, we started a four session gardening course to share the  biointensive gardening method – a method that produces more in less space, uses less water, and takes care to regenerate the soil. It is a method that will allow the women to seguir adelante.

Since the first and most important step in starting a biointensive garden is the elaboration of a compost pile, a large part of Session 1 was dedicated to compost. As humans, what we put inside of us is reflected on the outside. Similarly the soil quality, or the nutrients that are available to the plant’s roots, is reflected in the leaves, stems, vigor of the plant, etc. Also, many of the plagues that we encounter in the garden are a symptom of the larger problem of poor soil quality. Rather than focusing on recipes to expel plagues, we must think about addressing the root of the problem, the poor soil quality. This can be treated with compost piles, or the production of nutrient-rich soil.

Compost Pile

One of the things that I love about the biointensive method is the focus on using what is available at hand. Surveying the land in each community, we used different materials for the “green” and “brown” matter in the compost piles. In Piedras Lisas, we used vines of a harvested chayote plant and elotes. In Capula, we used grass and straw. In El Sauz, we used recently harvested corn stalks and dried grass. Each pile was adapted to what the women had in their community.

Here are some fun facts about compost:

*Compost improves soil structure by breaking up clay and clods. It also bonds sandy soils together.

*Compost creates soil with a good organic matter content, which holds much more water  and thus preventing erosion and nutrient run-off.

*Compost dissolves soil minerals, making them available to plants.

*Compost allows us to recycles nutrients back into the soil that we have taken nutrients from.

Image

The next part of the day’s lesson was to seed in transplanting boxes. Most of the women were accustomed to seeding directly in the soil, so this was a very new concept to them. Stressing the importance of using what is already on hand, we used milk boxes as our almácigos. Seeding in almácigo has the benefit of using a lot less water. Instead of watering the whole garden bed, you only have to water the small box. Also, you are able to give the seeds the best soil possible (your compost soil) and since the boxes are easy to move, you can better protect the seedlings from extreme temperatures.

Session 1 ended with homework of course. Each woman was assigned to go home and repeat what we had done during the day: Compost piles, seed boxes. Let’s see if they are good students…

the twigster,

Josephine

PS: Check out the biointensive gardening bible here.

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